New wearable headset device aims to treat PTSD

Brain State product plays soothing music to help relax the brain
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A new wearable headset device called the Braintellect 2 has been developed to help sufferers of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Brain State Technologies, the developer of the device, and Wake Forest School of Medicine, have published research that supports the device, suggesting that the wearable can help to minimise symptoms of PTSD by putting the brain in a relaxed state.

The research also states that people suffering sleep disorders such as insomnia are likely to develop PTSD, a condition that is mostly seen in ex-military personnel.

The device, a headset, works by playing different pitch tones which the wearer finds soothing. Insomnia sufferers tend to find relaxing before sleeping extremely problematic, therefore the device is designed to be worn before the user sleeps.

“We are excited about presenting this analysis to military health researchers, because prevention efforts tend to get too little attention. We think that focus on sleep quality could reduce PTSD not only in the military, but also in police, medical first-responders, and others who have high exposure to trauma,” said Brain State CEO Lee Gerdes.

Brain State also claims that the device is also beneficial in regards to providing individuals with an alternative to medications. It can be used instead of individuals taking prescribed medications that are known to cause side effects - or can even lead to addiction.

There is an emerging market for technology solutions and commercial medical treatments. For example, the Sleep Better app by Runtastic enables users to track and monitor their own sleeping patterns.

There are many other apps like this currently on the market, which is why Braintellect 2’s technology demonstrates the influence that wearables can potentially have in the future in regards to treating sleep deprivation.

Wearables have typically been known to focus on cardio and improving the users' general health, in terms of steps taken, but new devices like the Braintellect 2 show that there's a growing demand for wearables to focus on other areas of health and wellbeing too.

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