Kaspersky is moving from Russia to Switzerland

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Eugene Kaspersky

Following on from the new that it is to open a data centre in Switzerland, the company has made the drastic move to shift a number of its core processes to the country.

As a part of the company's Global Transparency Initiative, the processes being moved include customer data storage and processing for most regions, as well as software assembly, including threat detection updates. In an attempt to be clear as a bottle of Smirnoff, the activity is to be supervised by an independent third party, also based in Switzerland.

The Zurich data centre will be open by the end of 2019 and this facility will store and process all information for users in Europe, North America, Singapore, Australia, Japan and South Korea, with more countries to follow.

The company has also announced the opening of the first Transparency Centre. Appropriately, the Transparency Centre (also in Switzerland) will house the source code of Kaspersky Lab products and software updates that will be available for review by 'responsible stakeholders'. 

It's not been the best of years for Kaspersky, as the company's security software was banned within the US government in December 2017 amid fears of Kremlin influence. The fallout from that caused some to question whether the company would ever be able to recover, with the National Cyber Security Centre’s (NCSC) advising the UK government against using Kasperky products and prominent UK companies like Barclays ditched the brand. 

The company will now hope that its Swiss move will work with the efficiency of a ticking clock to help salvage its relationship with the west. This is certainly the position of Eugene Kaspersky, CEO of Kaspersky Lab.

“In a rapidly changing industry such as ours we have to adapt to the evolving needs of our clients, stakeholders and partners. Transparency is one such need, and that is why we’ve decided to redesign our infrastructure and move our data processing facilities to Switzerland. We believe such action will become a global trend for cybersecurity, and that a policy of trust will catch on across the industry as a key basic requirement.”

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