Rock aims to smash open business laptop market

UK vendor claims its high-end gaming heritage will help it deliver cutting edge business machines
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High end gaming specialist Rock has announced that it is to enter the business market with the launch of its Pegasus 210 laptop.

The Warwickshire-based firm, which was purchased by mobile entertainment group ROK last year, said the 12-inch Pegasus 210, which weighs just 1.5kg, is aimed at serious business users who demand a high quality and strong product with a very long battery life of six to eight hours.

The launch of the Pegasus marks a massive diversification for the UK vendor. Rock's Paul Shenton, however, keen to point out that it isn't just jumping into a random market with the release of the 210. "Rock thrives by creating or operating in niche markets," Rock's Paul Shenton told PC Retail.

"When we launched our first gaming laptop in 2003 we were one of only a handful of manufacturers in the world, now almost every brand has at least one model they would like to consider a gaming SKU yet Rock are considered market leaders."

"Rock is catering for both consumers and business customers that want smaller lighter machines with a long battery life (as also adopted by Apple more recently) but ultra-portable is still a niche market," Shenton added.

Regardless of its decision to move into the business market, many commentators will say it is moving into a very tough and competitive market with the likes of HP, Dell and Lenovo. Shenton though is confident that the company can compete, and even beat them.

"Gaming laptops are the cutting edge of performance and produce a lot of heat. It takes considerable skill to be able to produce the world's fastest notebook, yet make it reliable enough that you are confident of putting a three-year warranty on it.

"We have used these skills to produce a cool running machine which in turns provides long battery life and very low failure rates. For the Pegasus 210 to be economically viable for rock, we have aimed a 3G model at the business market pushing its ruggedized features.

"In terms of economy of scale having one machine for two markets is one reason we can undercut the corporate brands so substantially," added Shenton.

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