Robert Peckham: Why do so many people want to work for Apple?

MacTechnology's founder talks about working for Apple
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Robert Peckham talks about recent reports that suggest Apple may not be a great company to work for.

As I was preparing to write this month's article, a small announcement popped up on the newsgroups which I nearly didn't notice. I'm glad I didn't...

Fortune Magazine in the USA has just published its annual report for 2012 listing the 100 best-rated companies to work for, and not surprisingly Google is still rated as the number one hi-tech employer.

Saleforce.com and SAS are both in the top 20, Cisco and Intuit are in the top 50, and Microsoft rolls in at 75. But where is Apple in this hallowed line- up? Well, they aren't even on the list, and a quick call to Fortune Magazine confirmed they also didn't feature among the next 100 companies on this league table either.

Sorry? Apple currently employs over 60,000 people around the globe, which makes them one of the ten largest hi-tech employers in the world, and Apple is constantly mentioned in the press as a company that many people would actually like to work for, and yet they fail to rate as one of the best employers? So I jumped over to The Sunday Times to see if this was a similar story in the UK.

Sure enough, SAS are there in the top- 100 league, as are Google and Adobe. But again, no Apple.

I personally know many people working in Apple senior management, both in Europe and the USA. I've met Apple employees in many different departments, and I know lots of people who work in many Apple retail stores.

So I took some time out to ask some of them if they were surprised at the Fortune Magazine report, and the overwhelming response was a resounding no – it would appear that Apple really is NOT a great company to work for.

Digging a little deeper, I was not surprised to hear comments about lack of internal communication, unrealistic performance targets, lack of recognition for achievement, unexplained and illogical policies and practices. There is apparently a complete mystery about who is responsible for making any of the decisions higher up in the company.

I wonder if Apple is at all concerned at these reports and tables?

Robert Peckham is a 20-year veteran of the Apple reseller channel in the UK, and has managed many major Apple resellers. He founded the Mac Technology Association and was a director of the Technology Channels Association until their merger with CompTIA. He now runs MacTechnology, a consultancy for the Apple reseller channel which includes the Mac Tech Team support service.

robertpeckham@mac.com

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