PRISM Prevention Program protects businesses from government snooping

New "secure" service aims to protect companies' digital files
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An anti-PRISM programme has launched which aims to help companies protect their files from risks, including "exposure to potential government monitoring".

The PRISM Prevention Program from Egnyte lets businesses detect the internal use of unapproved and insecure cloud-only file sharing solutions, and lets them move those files to "a secure platform", away from any potential prying eyes.

The program includes a risk assessment, which promises to detect more than 20 common cloud-only file-sharing services, as well as five Egnyte Storage Connect licences to enable file access and sharing.

During the last six months of 2012, Facebook said it received as many as 10,000 requests from local, state and federal agencies, which impacted as many as 19,000 of its accounts worldwide, while Microsoft received between 6,000 and 7,000 criminal and security warrants, subpoenas and orders affecting as many as 32,000 customer accounts.

An IDG study found that three in five companies believe cloud file sharing has compromised their data security, and said that 61 per cent of all files would always need to be stored locally.

PRISM is an electronic surveillance data mining program said to have been operated by the US National Security Agency (NSA). 

“Due to concerns about privacy, security, intellectual property or mergers and acquisitions, businesses want to combine the simplicity and ease-of-use associated with cloud-file sharing with the security and privacy of their own infrastructure,” said Egnyte CEO Vineet Jain. 

“Our PRISM Prevention Program provides a business with everything it needs to detect cloud-only file sharing services that may introduce risk."

Over one billion files are shared daily by businesses using Egnyte's technology. The company also announced Storage Connect, a file sync and sharing platform for enterprise file-sharing needs.

Image source: Shutterstock (businessman with glass leaning against wall)

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