Office habits that could get you sacked - PC Retail

Office habits that could get you sacked

Managers in the technology and IT industry rate eating colleague?s food worst etiquette offense
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A survey polling over 250 managers working in the technology and IT industry has shown that eating a colleague’s food was the worst offence that you could commit in the workplace, with 96 per cent deeming such behavior unacceptable.

The survey, conducted by TheLadders.co.uk, revealed that the second biggest offense with 95 per cent condemnation was bad hygiene, including ‘smelly breath and dirty clothes.’

And just behind that, other habits such as flossing your teeth with a paperclip, picking your nose, refusing to help with office chores, wastefulness and loud talking all scored highly.

Other offenses such as eating smelly food in the office, bad language and drinking at lunchtime were deemed less offensive.

We can only conclude that the bulk of IT and technology employers consider forgetting to stick the dishwasher on and absently picking teeth with a paperclip worse behavior than employees rolling up to the office with a noxious smelling chicken vindaloo in hand after several lunchtime pints, swearing raucously at the rest of the office.

It seems that scenes like this are rife in the industry, with 74 per cent of managers claiming they had worked alongside a person who offended colleagues with a ‘complete lack of respect.’

However IT and technology offices do appear to be more lenient when it comes to the crunch, with only 12 per cent of bosses having fired an employee for a breach of etiquette.

Sarah Drew, General Manager of TheLadders.co.uk said: “Some argue that in the 21st century employers should move with the times and accept people’s behavior as just having adapted to the changes in society, but employees beware, in every office there exists an invisible line between professional and unprofessional behavior – just make sure you know where that line is.”

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