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HDTV should be free to air, say NEC - PC Retail

HDTV should be free to air, say NEC

78 per cent of those surveyed believe HDTV should air free of charge
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A survey conducted at the 2007 IBC conference has found that 78 per cent of respondents believe HDTV should air free. The survey shows little support for the paid-for services proposed for the future.

Once the digital switch over is complete in 2012, HD services could become free of charge in the UK under the Freesat initiative from ITV and the BBC but until then, the service is an additional extra available from broadcasters. The survey also found that over half of all respondents (53%) believed that the 2012 deadline is achievable.

Those at IBC 2007 showed awareness of the end-user benefits of DSO with the majority (46%) believing that more choice of viewing content will be the primary benefit, followed by better picture and sound quality (20%) and more flexible payment options (18%).

Derek Owen, general manager, marketing at NEC UK says: “Our poll reflects the general consensus of the industry that broadcast is an area in which there are many changes to come. Digital broadcasting, in any format, offers significantly more choice and a better quality experience.”

David Lyons, social infrastructure systems manager, NEC UK continues: “The DSO is at the forefront of these but as an industry which actively embraces new technology, there are more areas which broadcast will explore, such as HDTV, IPTV and digital cinema. NEC is in the privileged position of being able to facilitate the uptake of a broad range of new broadcast technologies and be part of the growth of the industry across Europe, with projects including installing the first custom built digital cinema in Europe at Vue at The O2 in London and the DSO project in the UK and Ireland.”

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