Half naked booth babes told to cover up at tech shows

RSA Conference is banning minimally dressed booth babes used to sell tech products at shows
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Ladies dressed in very little at tech shows are being banned from a tech security trade show next month.

The semi-naked tactic has previously been used to draw visitors to stands, and not just in the tech industry – however it has regularly been the subject of some debate, with some saying it is demeaning for companies to treat women in such a way, reports CNET.

Security event RSA Conference is flat out banning this method of marketing at its San Francisco-based trade show next month.

Sandra Toms, VP and curator of the RSA Conference said: "We want everyone to feel like they can comfortably enjoy all of the sessions and activities that this year's show has to offer."

While scantily dressed models have been used to garner attention throughout history, people are becoming less tolerant with it.

Carol Colatrella, author of Toys and Tools in Pink Cultural Narratives of Gender, Science, and Technology, commented: "The outcome of dressing women inappropriately establishing them as eye-candy or as decorative objects or hyper-sexualized figures, results in people taking women in general less seriously and being less inclined to hire women and promote women into positions of authority."

"[Instead of booth babes] why not just have a neon bulb that goes off to attract people's interest?"

RSA’s Toms concluded: "The new language in our Exhibitor Rules and Regulations was added to ensure that we provide an environment that is both professional and respectful of all attendees.”

Sexism in tech has caused some controversy in the tech trade of late, with Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft, commenting last October that female employees shouldn’t ask for promotions. He later apologised for the remarks.

The CEA has also clamped down on "inappropriate attire" being worn at the CES tech trade show over the past few years.

Last year PCR compiled the Top 50 Women in Technology list, and organised the PCR Woman of the Year event, which will return later this year.

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