UK student pleads guilty after earning £315,000 from DDoS tool - PC Retail

UK student pleads guilty after earning £315,000 from DDoS tool

A teen from Hertford has pled guilty to running the Titanium Stresser booter tool which offered DDoS attacks for hire
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A 19-year-old student from Hertford has pled guilty to running the Titanium Stresser booter tool which offered distributed denial of service (DDoS) as a service. 

According to the case's prosecutors, Adam Mudd earned in excess of £315,000 by renting out the service he created when he was 15. Titanium Stresser was marketed as a legitimate stress tester tool but was used by many as a cheap and effective way of taking down websites.

Pleading guilty at London's Old Bailey to two offences under the Computer Misuse Act and one money laundering offence, Mudd will be sentenced in December. He is accused of committing 594 DDoS attacks against 181 targets between December 2013 and March last year, but Bedfordshire Police say that the now dead Titanium Stressed was used in thousands of DDoS attacks by criminals renting the service. Prosecuters were able to catch Mudd thanks to his keeping of DDoS attack logs.

The platform became notorious as one of the most popular such services, and offered free 60-second DDoS attacks.

Titanium Stresser would create the foundation of the Lizard Stresser, another for-hire DDoS tool by Lizard Squad, a boastful hacking group that took down the Xbox Live and PlayStation Network servers over the 2014 christmas break.

Detective inspector Martin Peters of the Eastern Region Special Operations cyber crime unit said that the case frustrated him because of the misuse of Mudd's obvious talent. He said:

"Adam Mudd’s case is a regrettable one, because this young man clearly has a lot of skill, but he has been utilising that talent for personal gain at the expense of others.

"We want to make clear it is not our wish to unnecessarily criminalise young people, but want to harness those skills before they accelerate into crime."

Looks like Adam Mudd isn't the real life Mr. Robot after all.

PCR's Sector Spotlight on Security - in association with BullGuard - is running throughout November 2016 - click here for more articles

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