'In the future, the cloud will become a utility like electricity or water'

We interview Paul Lloyd of Entacloud as part of this month’s Cloud Sector Spotlight
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We chat to Paul Lloyd, head of distie Entatech’s new while label cloud offering Entacloud, about the advantages of starting a business in the cloud and the biggest benefits these services give customers.

How has the cloud market evolved over the past few years?
The cloud service business has evolved over the last few years in line with the internet. More and more services have become available and new businesses have been built. As connections have got faster and cheaper, the cost of datacentres has dropped in return.

What cloud services do you offer?
Entacloud offers a fully managed infrastructure as a service, which is fully configurable to deliver whatever services are required by the user, as well as Backup and Disaster Recovery as a Service. We only sell through the channel and allow the partners to make a sensible margin.

What types of customers do you work with?
We are working with channel partners that have a customer base who are looking to move towards cloud based services.

There are some startups born in the cloud. What are the benefits and disadvantages of this?
The biggest advantage of starting a cloud business is that if you are reselling third party services, you will note a very low cost of entry and setup cost. In addition, you can start small and scale up over time, which enables you to compete with other, major organisations within the UK.

The main disadvantage is that cloud isn’t a solution for everyone, and most companies will require a mixture of cloud and on-premise solutions.

How does the cloud help collaboration and remote working?
As cloud-based services are available anywhere in the world, at any time, they eliminate any issues with regards to collaboration, and remote workers can have services available wherever they can connect to the internet.

What would you say to businesses that are not interested in using or selling cloud services?
Today the impact is minimal, but over the next few years most service companies and their customers will want things delivered via the cloud, so businesses will get smaller and may fade out. All major vendors and stalwarts of the industry have a cloud offering currently, therefore the industry WILL do it that way – at an accelerated rate.

What are some of the biggest benefits to your customers who have got on board with the cloud?
Agility, the ability to have services available quickly and easily and to produce computing power on an adhoc utility basis. Over time users can save costs, through budgeting and predicting costs.

Is cloud right for everyone/every business?
No more than anything else. If there is a poor internet connection then it doesn’t work. Some businesses are regulated so they cannot use it as often as they perhaps would like.

Are you planning to expand your cloud offering?
We will broaden our services over time and, when they are required, will add additional services to meet the needs of our customers – and their own customer base.

What do you think will be the next big thing in the evolution of the cloud?
It will become a utility, the same as electricity or water.

Throughout January, PCR is running a dedicated Sector Spotlight on The Cloud – click the logo below for more articles

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