Can the Xbox One X reclaim the gaming market - PC comparison - PC Retail

Can the Xbox One X reclaim the gaming market - PC comparison

PCR puts the 'most powerful console ever' up against a couple of similarly priced PCs
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The Xbox One X (née Project Scorpio) was at the centre of attention last night at Xbox's E3 press conference and while everyone that appeared on the stage referred to it as the 'most powerful console ever', but how does it stack up against a similarly priced PC?

It's worth noting at this point that we don't have a UK price point for Xbox One X, with the US RRP sitting at $499. Given the current state of affairs, you can expect the console to sit anywhere between £450-£500. So, to get us started, here's how the X fits into the existing Xbox One family with the full spec sheet:

Spec

Xbox One X

Xbox One S

Xbox One

Size

30cm x 24cm x 6cm

29.5cm x 23cm x 6.5cm

34.3cm x 26.3cm 8cm

Weight

8.4lbs

6.4lbs

7.8lbs

CPU

Custom CPU @ 2.3 GHz, 8 cores

Custom Jaguar CPU @ 1.75GHz, 8 cores

Custom Jaguar CPU @ 1.75GHz, 8 cores

GPU

Custom GPU @ 1.172 GHz, 40 CUs, Polaris features, 6.0 TFLOPS

Custom GPU @ 914 MHz, 12 CUs, 1.4 TFLOPS

Custom GPU @ 853 MHz, 12 CUs, 1.3 TFLOPS

Memory

12 GB GDDR5 @ 326 GB/s

8 GB DDR3 @ 68 GB/s, 32 MB ESRAM @ 218 GB/s

8 GB DDR3 @ 68 GB/s, 32 MB ESRAM @ 204 GB/s

Flash

8GB

8GB

8GB

Internal Storage

1TB HDD

500GB, 1TB, 2TB HDD

500GB, 1TB HDD

Optical Disc Drive

4K UHD Blu-ray

4K UHD Blu-ray

Blu-ray

PSU

245W, Internal

120W, Internal

220W, External

HDMI resolution and framerate

2160p @ 60Hz AMD FreeSync HDMI Variable Refresh Rate (when ratified)

2160p @ 60Hz

1080p @ 60Hz

HDR10 Support

Yes

Yes

No

Content Protection

HDCP 2.2

HDCP 2.2

HDCP 1.4

Video CODECs

HEVC/H.265, VP9, AVC/H.264, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 Part 2, VC1/WMV9

HEVC/H.265, AVC/H.264, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 Part 2, VC1/WMV9

AVC/H.264, MPEG-2, MPEG-4 Part 2, VC1/WMV9

HDMI audio, encoded

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0, 5.1, & 7.1; Dolby TrueHD w/Atmos (from games)

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0, 5.1, & 7.1; Dolby TrueHD w/Atmos (from games)

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0, 5.1, & 7.1; Dolby TrueHD w/Atmos (from games)

HDMI audio, passthru

Dolby TrueHD (opt. Atmos), DD+ (opt. Atmos), DTS-HR/MA (opt. DTS:X)

Dolby TrueHD (opt. Atmos), DD+ (opt. Atmos), DTS-HR/MA (opt. DTS:X)

Dolby TrueHD (opt. Atmos), DD+ (opt. Atmos), DTS-HR/MA (opt. DTS:X)

S/PDIF audio, encoded

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0

Dolby Digital 5.1, DTS 5.1, PCM 2.0

CODECs decoded

AAC, MP3, MPEG1, WMV

AAC, MP3, MPEG1, WMV

AAC, MP3, MPEG1, WMV

Wireless

IEEE 802.11ac dual band (5GHz & 2.4GHz), 2×2 wireless Wi-Fi with Wi-Fi Direct for home networks

IEEE 802.11ac dual band (5GHz & 2.4GHz), 2×2 wireless Wi-Fi with Wi-Fi Direct for home networks

Dual band 2.4GHz and 5GHz spectrums, compatible with IEEE 802.11/a/b/g/n networks

Ethernet

IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000

IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000

IEEE 802.3 10/100/1000

Accessories Radio

Dedicated dual band Xbox Wireless radio

Dedicated dual band Xbox Wireless radio

Dedicated dual band Xbox Wireless radio

USB Port

3x USB 3.0

3x USB 3.0

3x USB 3.0

HDMI Out

2.0b

2.0a

1.4b

HDMI In

1.4b

1.4b

1.4b

S/PDIF

Yes

Yes

Yes

IR Receiver/IR Blaster Port

Yes

Yes

Yes

IR Blaster

Yes

Yes

No

Kinect Port

External USB Adapter

External USB Adapter

Yes

With all of that in mind I scouted about the internet for a couple of similarly priced gaming PCs and came up with these two from Chillblast and Overclockers. I've taken out a lot of the fluff details from above (I'm sure you won't be losing any sleep when you find out that you can't use Kinect with the PCs).

Spec

Xbox One X

Chillblast Fusion Mini Mumbo Gaming PC

Titan Hawk Overclocked Gaming PC

Size

30cm x 24cm x 6cm

26cm x 28cm x 19cm

 

CPU

Custom CPU @ 2.3 GHz, 8 cores

Intel Pentium G4560 @ 3.5 GHz, 2 cores

AMD FX-4 4300 @ 4.2GHz, quad core

GPU  

Custom GPU @ 1.172 GHz, 40 CUs, Polaris features, 6.0 TFLOPs

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050, 2GB GDDR5, 1.8 TFLOPs

AMD Radeon RX 460, 2GB GDDR5, 14 CUs, 2.2 TFLOPs

Memory

12 GB GDDR5 @ 326 GB/s

8GB DDR4 2133MHz

8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 1600MHz

Flash

8GB

8GB

8GB

Internal Storage

1TB HDD

Seagate 1TB 7200RPM HDD

Seagate 1TB 7200RPM HDD

Optical Disc Drive

4K UHD Blu-ray

None

None

PSU

245W, Internal

500W, Internal

450W, Internal

HDMI resolution and framerate

2160p @ 60Hz AMD FreeSync HDMI Variable Refresh Rate (when ratified)

Maximum resolution: 7680x4320@60Hz

Maximum resolution: 4096 x 2160@60Hz

Content Protection

HDCP 2.2

None

None

USB Port

3x USB 3.0

4x USB 3.0, 4 x USB 2.0

4x USB 3.0, 4 x USB 2.0

Operating System

Custom Windows 10

Windows 10 Home

Windows 10 64 Bit

VR Ready

Yes

No

No

Price

$499 (£450-£500)

£499.99

£529.99

On paper then the Xbox One X is actually pretty competitive with the PCs and has it beat in a couple of respects when it comes to memory and having more cores in the CPU department. The resolution is the big selling point of the X, with Microsoft stating that gamers will be playing in full 4K at a consistent framerate. While the Chillblast PC can potentially run at a ludicrous 7680x4320, realistically with the specs that it and the Overclockers PC have you'll be looking at 1080p and a solid 30-60 fps depending on the title and graphics settings. 

Obviously it's worth bearing in mind as well that the console comes with a controller while you'll have to stick on an extra £100 or so for a decent mouse and keyboard. 

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I can safely say that I am impressed with the Xbox One X. What is underneath the hood of the smallest Xbox ever is competitve, but the biggest drawback for some may be the price. In the PC gaming community consumers are used to paying upwards of £500 for a decent rig, but consoles are an entirely different market. 

By contrast, the PlayStation 4 Pro retails at £349.99/$399.99 – a full $100 less than the X. And that's before even considering that Sony may announce a price cut at its press conference on Monday. Meanwhile, the Nintendo Switch sits at £279.99.

Ultimately developers will determine the success of the Xbox One X. While you can boast all you like about specs, unlike a PC where modders can improve a game's look or performance or creators can take advantage in video/audio/photo editing, a console is all down to the games (and Netflix, but a toaster can run Netflix in 2017).

If the Xbox One X has the support from developers it can flourish and, potentially, draw the gamers who moved over to PC back in.

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