Home / Analysis / People who use tech feel 10 years younger, says Lenovo

People who use tech feel 10 years younger, says Lenovo

New research from Lenovo has suggested a growing relationship between technological innovation and wellbeing, revealing that many people feel “younger, healthier and more emotionally connected” when using tech.

The research, which surveyed over 15,000 individuals from the UK, US, Mexico, Brazil, China, India, Japan, Germany, France and Italy, found that technology made UK respondents feel 10 years younger on average.

The research generally revealed that many older generations think using technology helps them to connect better with younger people as well as feel livelier and more knowledgeable. This is especially evident when it comes to the role smart devices (from PCs, tablets to smart home assistants and more) play in terms of relationships with family and friends. When asked to compare technology today to those of 20 years ago for giving them the ability to feel connected to what is going on in the lives of the people they care about, 61% answered it’s “getting better”. While 71% also said technology is improving their ability to stay in touch with family and friends who live far away.

The research also revealed that tech is helping people when it comes to mental health and wellbeing, offering emotional gains, particularly in parents. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of UK working parents stated the ever-connected nature of technology helps them feel more emotionally connected to their children, even when they are away from home. An even larger portion (82%) of UK working parents agreed that emerging technologies are making it easier for them to feel confident that their kids are safe and secure while they are at work.

“Keeping up with advancements in technology can feel like a full-time job, but it can have positive impacts on people’s sense of themselves and their age. While older people are stereotyped as being techno-phobic or inept at staying on trend, this research points to the fact that maintaining currency in the digital space helps people feel more youthful, more connected to young people and youth culture, which in turns is a social currency for feeling valued and a sense of belonging or in ‘the know’,” said psychologist and founder of Digital Nutrition, Jocelyn Brewer.

“It’s this tech knowledge that drives the perception of feeling younger, without having to revisit the angst of our adolescence! Staying connected to the people we care about is a wonderful feature of technology. And while it is no replacement for face-to-face connection, it is a valuable supplement to communication for those who might be geographically divided. Parents can manage a range of responsibilities and provide increasing appropriate autonomy to teenagers through a variety of communication tools, reminders and systems that can help take the struggle out of the daily juggle.”

Nearly two-thirds (62%) of UK respondents in the survey stated they were optimistic about the future of technology and the role tech can play in our lives and society, especially in wellbeing, with 55% believing devices are currently having a positive impact on the ability to improve their overall health.

Dilip Bhatia, vice president of user and customer experience at Lenovo, commented: “There is a growing relationship between innovation and wellbeing as smart technologies are not only helping people globally to stay more connected but aiding wellbeing in the form of compassion and empathy by building better connections between them.

“Technology has a transformational ability to unite people across generations and walks of life around the world, with the potential to help them to live healthier and more fulfilling lives. At Lenovo, we passionately believe in creating smarter technology for all, which is why we focus on making our technology accessible, blending into the everyday lives for the benefit of more people.”

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