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A study by the CEA has found that 99 per cent of all air passenger travel with at least one personal electronic device

30 per cent of flyers ‘accidentally’ use their electronic devices during take off

A study has found that whilst 99 per cent of flyers travel with a personal electronic device, 30 per cent opt to leave their devices switched on throughout the flight.

The Consumer Electronics Association polled US travellers in conjunction with the Airline Passenger Experience Association on their in-flight habits and found that nearly all carried at least one personal electronic device (PED) onboard with them.

Meanwhile, 69 per cent of these participants admitted to using such devices during the flight, all be it at permitted times.

However, the study also revealed that 30 per cent of those questioned confessed to leaving their devices powered on throughout the flight, including both takeoff and landing.

Whilst these individuals characterised the use as ‘accidental’, it’s more likely that they simply opted to continue to use their device despite warnings from flight officials.

This study showed us that most travellers are using their PEDs as often as possible while traveling, and many would like even more opportunities to use their devices” said Russell A. Lemieux, APEX executive director.

Of those who chose to travel with PEDs, 59 per cent said they turned the devices off once on the plane, whilst 21 per cent opted to switch to airplane mode and just 5 per cent turned off the devices all together.

As for the devices themselves, most popular proved to be the smartphone, making up 28 per cent of all devices commonly used mid-flight. Meanwhile, laptops and tablets came in second and third, closely followed by audio players and e-readers.

“Airline passengers have come to rely on their smartphones, tablets and e-Readers as essential travel companions,” said Doug Johnson, vice president of technology policy at CEA.

“Understanding the attitudes and behaviours of passengers that are using electronic devices while traveling will help the FAA make informed decisions.”

Airline image from Shutterstock

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