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AdMob claims 70 per cent of coders are going cross-platform

Majority of iPhone developers migrating to Android

70 per cent of iPhone developers are planning to release apps for Android in the next six months, according to a new survey conducted by mobile advertising firm AdMob.

Its study also found that 31 per cent of developers in its network are working on multiple mobile platforms today, and 47 per cent say they plan to do so in the next six months.

58 per cent of AdMob’s network currently develop mobile websites, and 49 per cent of respondents say they have been developing for mobile for less than a year.

The survey results were released as AdMob unveiled new advertising SDKs for iPhone, Android and Flash Lite, as well as a set of new tools for developers.

The Android SDK brings AdMob’s rich media ad units to the platform – they were previously only available within iPhone apps. The Flash Lite SDK is completely new, and will let developers put CPC text ads in their Flash Lite apps.

New tools include a new publisher dashboard to view stats from apps and mobile websites, a better interface for running and saving reports, and a beta Reporting API to allow developers to build their own tools and dashboards.

Meanwhile, AdMob is relaunching the AdWhirl ad mediation service for iPhone and Android apps – it bought AdWhirl last year.

"The explosive growth we’re seeing makes it an exciting time to be an important part of the mobile advertising industry," says CEO Omar Hamoui.

"We’ve worked very hard to create innovative ways to help mobile developers achieve their goals and easily manage their business – whether on the iPhone, Android or other emerging platforms."

There’s still no news on AdMob’s acquisition by Google, but ramping up support for Android makes sense, given the platform’s growth (not to mention the popularity on Android Market of ad-supported free apps).

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