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Microsoft and John Lewis find over two thirds of parents ask their kids for tech advice

Laura Barnes
Microsoft and John Lewis find over two thirds of parents ask their kids for tech advice

A new survey reveals that parents are struggling to keep up with today’s technology.

Of the 1,000 parents surveyed, 67 per cent admitted to asking their teenage children for technology related advice.

Matt Leeser, Head of Buying at John Lewis comments: “Technology moves at such a fast pace, you only have to look at how touch screen gadgets have come into force in the last four years. Children are more exposed to new gadgets and services that’s why parents are turning to their tech savvy kids for advice. At John Lewis, we know how important it is for parents to get expert advice when they’re buying technology for themselves or the family – this is why we train our partners to provide guidance in-store and keep them updated with the latest trends.”

The findings show that technology help courtesy of teenagers isn’t just restricted to gadgets, 21 per cent of parents go to their children for help setting up their social media profile.

Mae Moran, aged thirteen, commented: “My mum’s always asking me how to use her mobile. She’s only just worked out how to use the camera but can never download any of her photos. I’ve got her using SkyDrive now, which is so much easier. Because I synched up all our devices, she can save her pictures down when she’s at work and then I do the editing for her on my laptop. Next step will be to get her uploading them to Facebook.”

28 per cent of parents surveyed said they turn to their children for tech advice ahead of friends, partners or work colleagues.

“The research shows that busy parents are gleaning the expertise of a younger, tech savvy generation to save time and help them get the most out of their gadgets,” said Abigail Rappoport, Microsoft Office Division Director UK.

Microsoft and John Lewis find over two thirds of parents ask their kids for tech advice

The research, commissioned by John Lewis and Microsoft and conducted by Opinium, lays out the top five tech troubles that parents seek help for from their children, including installing products or services (46%), help using their phone (45%), using the internet (41%), help with the TV/home entertainment system (37%), and advice on what products to buy (31%).

Parent and child using computer image via ShutterStock.com

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Tags: Microsoft, John Lewis, technology, Opinuim, Matt Leeser, Abigail Rappoport

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